If the birds are out in your area, chances are they are looking for a place to nest. Try your hand at doodle-painting a cute little birdhouse to help them start a family. Who knows, they may be lurking in your yard like a depressed House Hunter’s couple who can’t get past the color on your neighbor’s birdhouse. Check out this cute Doodle-Painted Birdhouse.

Doodle Painted Birdhouse

Doodle-Painted Birdhouse

Have you lost your mind Brittany? This looks like a Christmas tutorial in May? No, I haven’t lost my mind and yes, this is May (for those of us who have lost track of the days. But, this is the perfect project for anyone who has a simple birdhouse that needs sprucing up for those discerning House Hunter birds.

Although I created this little painted birdhouse to function as a tree topper, you can forgo drilling a hole in the bottom and add a hook to have a fully functional birdhouse for those bird watchers in your home.

This is a project you can do for fun or meditation. And kids can also get in the fun. All you need is some acrylic paint and a paint pen and you can have a blast making this Doodle-Painted Birdhouse for yourself or as a gift.

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Optional:

 

Instructions:

Spray prime the unfinished birdhouse and allow it to dry thoroughly.

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

Sketch a star shape on the sides of the birdhouse. Mark the location where you wish to drill holes. (If you are using this for an outdoor birdhouse, it’s nice to have a little ventilation for the house. But, feel free to skip this step if you wish.)

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

If your birdhouse is a double-decker, you will probably want to drill holes through the sides at angle and down into the first floor roof. This will allow some of the light to come through the top story holes as well.

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

For Tree Topper Only:

Mark the center location on the bottom and drill a 5/8″ hole through the bottom of the birdhouse. (Skip this step if you want a functional birdhouse.)

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

Dump any wood shavings out of the birdhouse. Set up the birdhouse on the drop cloth for painting.

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

Paint the sides of the birdhouse red (or any color you like.)

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

Paint the roof, steeple, and perches gold. Add a star and tree shape on the sides to accentuate the drilled hole patterns.

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

After the gold and red paint has dried completely, use the white paint pen to doodle-paint all over the birdhouse.

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

Afraid to Doodle-Paint?

Nonsense, there is no rhyme or reason to the doodling, just make lots of little curly q’s, c’s, and loops. You can start by outlining the window structures. Then embellish them. Regardless of your doodle-painting style, it’s important to have fun!

You can see how I used the same technique on the chalkboard ornaments on my Feathered Nest Christmas Tree and they came out really cute.

Doodle Chalkboard Ornament | Pretty Handy Girl

When the paint pen lines have dried, add a few coats of an outdoor sealant.

Birdhouse Tree Topper:

You can use it as a tree topper by feeding the top branch(es) into the hole on the bottom of the birdhouse.

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

Outdoor Birdhouse:

Add the screw eye hook and hang the birdhouse from a tree in your yard.

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

Décor Birdhouse:

If you simply want to display your birdhouse as décor, set a little battery-powered light inside the hole in the bottom and enjoy a homey birdhouse on a shelf.

Painted Birdhouse Tree Topper Tutorial | Pretty Handy Girl

Want to decorate your birdhouse more? You can see how I created this little Christmas painted birdhouse and embellished the roof.

Christmas Wreath handpainted birdhouse | Pretty Handy Girl

Doodle-painted birdhouses are adorable gifts and very frugal. Make it May is almost over, but stay tuned for one more project!

PHGFancySign

Pin for later!

How to Make a Painted Bird House Tree Topper | Pretty Handy Girl

Spring is here and there are countless flowers awakening from the cold winter slumber. When it happens you can pick some blooms and turn them into easy gift ideas. Today I’ll show you how to make easy pounded flower art.

easy_pounded_Flower_Gift_ideasjpg

Easy Pounded Flower Gift Ideas

The results can be used for a framed quote, a paper-wrapped vase, notecards, and much more! I’d go so far to say, the results are close to high end (and expensive) handmade pressed flower paper.

Ready to make some beautiful pounded flower paper? I am (because I could also use an activity to get a little frustration out 😉.)

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

materials

Instructions:

First, you’ll want to collect some flowers. Smaller colorful flowers work best. But, you can collect larger ones and experiment.

Lay one sheet of paper on top of the block of wood. Arrange your flowers on top of the paper and tape down any strands that don’t cooperate. (The flowers I picked are from a money plant that grows in our woods.)

tape_flower_into_shape

Lay a second sheet of paper on top of the flowers.

cover_flower_with_2nd_paper

Pound the hammer around the paper until you have squished all of the flowers beneath. (This doubles as a stress relief exercise, trust me!)
hammer_paper_and_flowers

Peel apart the papers and you’ll have a pulpy mess.

pull_apart_papers

Remove the flowers and wipe off the excess bits and pieces with a clean chip brush.

wipe_off_flower_guts

Look at that! You got two prints that are a mirror image.

duplicate_pounded_flower_prints

Print out a quote or type a message on coordinating paper and tear around it. Tape it onto flower paper.

tape_phrase_onto_paper

Put your verse artwork into a frame for a sweet gift to your sister, your mother, or a friend.

close_up_phrase_flower_art

Take the other sheet and wrap it around a can, mason jar, or vase.

roll_paper_around_mason_jar

Wrap some twine around the paper to hold it in place. Add water to the vase and pop some fresh flowers in it.

close_up_pounded_flower_vase

Quick and easy gift idea, right?! Give a vase to brighten someone’s day. The best part of this gift is it only cost a pound! (Get it? Like a British £? I know, I have a corny sense of humor. You can blame it on my Dad, it runs on his side of the family.)

Maybe I’ve also been hammering a little too much lately. Leave me a comment if you have any corny jokes to share!

pounded_Flower_art

Do you have any creative ideas for using this pretty flower paper? I set some up for the kids and they had a blast pounding flowers.

PHGFancySign

Need a quick gift using scrap wood? A Creative Block Desk & Art Utensil Holder is an easy and fun gift to make and certainly a project that you can customize to meet your needs. Best of all, the kids can help with the painting step!

create_art_block_holders_sm

Creative Block Desk & Art Utensil Holder

Mother’s Day is this coming weekend! Have you decided how to show her your appreciation and love?! I did! My mother is a professional artist. She creates amazing paintings that inspire others and brightens their homes. For Mother’s Day I wanted to brighten her studio with these art utensil holders. I call them “Creative Blocks.”

Go ahead and raid your scrap pile and join us as we make these colorful and fun Creative Block Desk & Art Utensil Holders.

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

materials_wood_blocks_sm

Instructions:

1. Block assembly: Select two 2×4″ scraps cut to the same length. Spread glue on one board and sandwich them together.

glue_blocks_together_sm

Clamp the wood together and drill two small holes to countersink the heads of the screws. Drive two screws into the bottom of the wood to hold the pieces together.

drill_blocks_together_sm

Use a band saw, jigsaw, or table saw to trim off the rounded edges of the wood so you have a square block of wood with straight corners.

square_off_2x4s_bandsaw_sm

Putty any cracks or holes. Sand until smooth.

putty_and_sand_blocks_sm

2. Creating the mask:

If you have a craft cutter (Silhouette or Cricut) you can create a mask in vinyl easily. But, if you don’t you can use the computer to print out your words. Lay the print out on top of a strip of Painter’s Tape. Use a few pieces of tape to secure the corners.

create_art_printout

Trace around the words with the X-acto knife (be sure to have a few fresh blades on hand.) Transfer the resulting cut-out tape onto the block of wood. Press the edges of the tape mask to secure the tape.

add_scotch_blue_tape_letters

3. Painting the block: Paint a base color onto the block. Then use a brush and/or palette knife to dab thick paint over the block (minus the base.) Use the X-acto knife to gently peel off the tape mask. Let the paint dry thoroughly overnight.

lift_tape_up

4. Drilling Holes:  After the paint has dried completely, mark the location of the utensil holes with a pencil. Put a piece of painter’s tape on the drill bit to mark the depth of your holes. Clamp the block and drill holes at each pencil mark.

drill_holes

Dump sawdust out of the holes.

Wrap up the blocks in gift wrap and enjoy the look of joy as your Mom opens her Creative Block Mother’s Day gift!

create_pencil_holder_sm

art_brush_holder

You know, as an artist myself, I almost loved these too much to give them away. But, my Mom is worth it. (And I can make another set if I want ;-).)

create_art_block_holders_sm

For more last-minute Mother’s Day gift ideas and many other creative projects, check out the Gift Ideas section here on the blog.

PHGFancySignIf you liked this project, you’ll love these floating picture frames using more 2×4 scrap wood.

wood-block-picture-frames

How-to-faux-paint-a-fake-pumpkinHow to Fake a Fake Pumpkin

Have you seen those neon orange fake pumpkins and nearly vomited because you wouldn’t dream of decorating with them. I mean—get real—everyone would know they were fake. Ah ha, but have you seen the price tags? $1 – $6? For that price you might just be willing to take a leap of faith with me, wouldn’t you? Awesome, because I’m going to show you how to faux paint a fake pumpkin so you can decorate with them year after year and fool your friends.

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

materials

Instructions:

Start by painting all the pumpkins with Chalk Paint (use gray, white, green and blue paint.) Allow the pumpkins to dry.

paint-pumpkins-french-linen

Painting Realistic White Pumpkins:

It helps to look up some pictures of real pumpkins to refer to.

pure-white-country-grey

Using the stencil brush, paint a mixture of grey and white on one of the pumpkins.

paint-white-mixture

Before the paint dries, dab some of it off with the sea sponge. (Keep your sea sponge dry, not wet during the process.)

sponge-off-white

Dip the stencil brush into the white paint and add paint on the outer most bumps on the pumpkins. This is adding highlights.

highlights_on-white-pumpkin

Dab the highlights gently with the sea sponge to blend.

sponge-off-white-2

Use the fan brush dipped in a small amount of green paint inside the pumpkin ridges. Dab the ridges with the sea sponge to blend.

white-gourd-pumpkin

Have you ever seen a truly unblemished pumpkin? I think not. It’s time to add some spots or marks on the pumpkin to truly fool your friends. Dip the end of the paint brush into brown paint and dot it onto the pumpkin. Blot the spot with a sea sponge and maybe even transfer a few new spots with the sponge.

add-blemishes

Paint grey around the base of the stem and into the grooves with the round paint brush.

add-dark-depth-around-stem

Paint brown and green paint onto the pumpkin stem. Blend slightly with the sea sponge.

paint-sponge-stem

Can you spot my fake white pumpkin? Well, of course you can because I just showed you how to paint it. But, it will definitely fool your friends!

grouping_left_pumpkins

Painting Realistic Blue Pumpkins:

Painting blue pumpkins uses the same technique as painting the white pumpkins, only using a few different colors.

Use the stencil brush to paint blue onto another pumpkin. Dab the blue paint while it’s still wet with the sea sponge.

add-duck-egg-blue-sponge

Use the fan brush dipped in gray and brown craft paint to fill in the ridges.

darken-crevices

Dab the paint with the dry sea sponge to blend.

sponge-crevices

Add some highlights with a mixture of grey and white. This serves two purposes. 1) It adds dimension. 2) It tones down the excess blue on the pumpkin.

add-highlights

Paint the stem the same way you learned above.

To truly fool people, set up your fake pumpkins with some real pumpkins and real gourds. Sooo, can you spot the fakes?

guess-the-fakes

How many did you get right? The metallic gourd is simply spray-painted with copper spray paint. But, I did try my hand at faking a green and yellow gourd using the same technique as the pumpkins, but adding green to the top and yellow to the bottom.

the_fakes

Okay, I’ll give you a second shot. Guess the fakes:

vertical-fall-vignette

How did you do this time? Ha, you can now apply for a job as an art forgery detective ;-).

truth_fake_gourds
Now seriously, how many people will be viewing your pumpkins that close? Umm, next to no one. Normally they’ll view them from afar.

full-living-room-shot

Get your paints and palette out and go fake some fakes! It will be our little secret.

fall-vignette-grouping

PHGFancySignDid you like this painting post? Ahhh, then I know you’ll like this Ballard Pear painting tutorial:

Or if you’re feeling like taking on a larger scale project…how about Faux painted bricks!

Or perhaps you’d like to perform some faux zinc painting magic:

You can do it! I know you can.

How to Build a Custom Vintage Wood Ruler FrameHow to Build a Custom Vintage Ruler Picture Frame

Every year when I go to meet my sons’ new teachers, I tell them if there is anything that needs fixing to let me know. It’s my small show of appreciation for all they do for my kids. Before Christmas, one of the teachers took me up on my offer. She asked me to fix a frame that had fallen off the wall and broke. I took one look at the cheap MDF frame and knew it was beyond repair. I didn’t tell her, because I wanted to surprise her with a Custom Built Vintage Ruler Picture Frame.

The great thing about this project is it uses cheap 1″ x 4″ lumber. And you can add your own moulding to dress up the frame if you like. Or just leave the frame plain, either way you’ll save major money by building your own custom frames!

Ready to learn how to build your own custom vintage ruler picture frame? Let’s get framing!

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Instructions:

This tutorial assumes you have mounted art and glass, but if you don’t you can follow this tutorial for cutting your own art mats.

How to Cut an Art Mat Like a Pro | Pretty Handy Girl

Cutting the Frame:

Use a table saw to rip your 1″ x 4″ lumber. Run your board through the saw along the 4″ side, then flip the wood up and run it through again. This will take 1/4″ off one corner to create a rabbet to place your art into.

Lay your ripped 1″ x 4″ boards against the fence of your miter saw. (I like to pre-cut four pieces a few inches larger than my artwork.) Cut one end of your boards at a 45° angle (angle the saw blade to position the rabbet on the short side.)

Set one board against your art. Before cutting the other side, measure the width of the art. Add an extra 1/8 inch. Mark the inside corner and cut to length (angling the miter saw blade in the opposite direction as your first cut.)

Take your first cut board and lay it on to of a second board. A quick way to cut them exactly the same length is to place the already cut board on top of the second board and line up the ends. Then line the blade up with the cut on your first board.   Clamp the boards down and cut.

Dry fit the two identical sides. Lay one 1″ x 4″ board over the cut boards at a 9o° angle. Mark the inner corner where you need to cut.

Cut the side piece and dry fit to make sure the cut is perfect.

Repeat the process above to cut two identical parallel side pieces.

Dry fit the frame around your artwork to make sure everything is square and fits inside the rabbet.

 

Assembling the Frame:

Apply a line of wood glue on the corners.

Clamp the corners with a 90° clamp then use your staple gun to fasten them together (on the back side of your frame). The wood glue is strong, but this will hold it in place while the glue dries.

I like to add 1 ½” brad nails (one on each side of the corners) to further hold the frame together. (I don’t want the teacher’s frame to fall apart ever again!)

Clamp the frame and let the wood glue harden. If you don’t have clamps long enough, here is how to make one long clamp with two short clamps!

While the glue cures, cut off any chipped, broken, or rounded ends from your vintage rulers.

Lay the first two rulers against the outer edge of your frame.

Mark the ruler where you need to trim and cut off the excess.

Continue until the outer edge of your frame is covered by rulers. Then start working on the inside of the first rulers. Measure, mark and cut the rulers to fit. Don’t worry if you are left with a small section of frame showing.

After all the rulers are measured and cut, use wood glue to adhere them to the frame. Follow up with a few brad nails to hold the rulers in place while the glue dries.

Sand the edges lightly with your sander to remove any splinters or rough edges.

Securing Artwork and Adding Hanging Hardware:

Fit your artwork into the frame. Place a framing point onto the back of the artwork with the point toward the frame. Use a 5-in-1-painter’s tool (or other flat tool) to push the point into the wooden frame. These will hold your artwork secure within the frame.

Add your hanging hardware. I prefer using D-rings and picture hanging wire, but you can use any hanging hardware you like.

Congratulations! You are done and now have a beautiful (and unique) Custom Vintage Ruler Picture Frame!

This is an easy project to build and enables you to customize the frame to any size that you need. The vintage rulers add some character and charm to the frame.

I hope you liked this tutorial on How to Build a Custom Vintage Ruler Picture Frame. Check your local vintage shops, Craig’s List or Ebay for some rulers and make one of your own!

Pin or Share this project with your friends! Because friends don’t let friends spend lots of money on art frames!

If you liked this tutorial, you’ll love these frames:

Scrap Wood Shadow Box Frame:

Rustic Scrap Wood Shadow Box Frame | Pretty Handy Girl

DIY Plywood Frames:Simple Plywood Frames

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

Are you guilty of hanging canvas art with no frame? (Yup, my hand is raised.) There are no longer any excuses for this behavior once I show you How to Quickly & Easily Frame Canvas Art. If you want to remain frameless and oblivious, close your browser now. For the rest of us, behold how easy it is to frame canvas art! Ready to get framing?

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

We have a painting in our dining room that I love. It was created by my husband’s grandmother. I will always appreciate that I had the opportunity to meet her when she was still alive.  She discovered she liked paining much later in life. Being an art major myself, we would frequently talk about art when we got together. At the time I was a tight brushstroke and detail oriented painter, but I longed to loosen up and paint more abstract paintings. For this reason, I cherish this painting she made. Of course, you probably wouldn’t realize it by its state of framelessness.

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

Gasp! Raw canvas edges. . . how could I leave it naked for so many years? In my defense, if you look at the painting straight on from across the room, you can’t see those edges. I know, that’s a lousy excuse.

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

Let’s go ahead and cover those raw edges and end my shame right now. I had some leftover Timberchic planks from my pantry project that I was able to use for this project. (Disclosure: I was provided with the Timberchic planks for free in exchange for mention in my pantry project.)

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Instructions:

If you are using Timberchic panels (or scrap 1/4″ material), measure the width of your canvas. Add about 1/8″ to the measurement.

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

Rip the panels to the desired width. (I used 1″ widths)

Pantry with Coffee Bar and Hidden Wine Storage | Pretty Handy Girl

Line up one edge of your wood slat with the bottom of your canvas. Mark the other side of the canvas and cut the slat to size. Repeat for the top of the canvas.

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

Remove the adhesive backing and secure the slats to the top and bottom of the canvas. (Or use brad nails.)

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

Line up another slat against the side of your canvas. Mark to the edge of the previously secured slats.

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

Cut the side slats and secure to the sides of your canvas. (Use brad nails or adhesive tape.)

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

All done! Hang up your framed canvas proudly.

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

That looks much better.

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

To be truthful, the slats won’t line up perfectly if you use the adhesive tape. But, no one is looking that close.

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

When compared to the before. . .

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

. . . that after looks much more finished. Am I right?

How to Quickly and Easily Frame Canvas Art | Pretty Handy Girl

Do you have any canvas artwork that needs a little finish framing? Can you think of anything easier than this method?

Rustic Scrap Wood Shadow Box Frame | Pretty Handy Girl

Okay all you woodworkers. You know as well as I do that you have an ever growing scrap wood pile that you don’t want to throw away because you know you’ll use it one day.

Rustic Scrap Wood Shadow Box Frame | Pretty Handy Girl

Well, today is that day! I challenge you to use some of that scrap wood to make a Scrap Wood Shadow Box Frame like this one.

But, if this isn’t your cup of tea, Sawdust Girl has an entire link up party of scrap wood projects. And you can link up your own scrap wood challenge too!

Okay, so the truth behind this project is that Pretty Handsome Guy has been begging me to frame his U.S. Open flag from Pinehurst almost two years ago. My poor hubby rarely asks for anything, and I figure he waited long enough.

Materials:

  • Scrap wood
  • Backer board (scrap bead board, masonite, thin plywood)
  • Construction glue
  • Lattice edging
  • Wood stain
  • Plexi-glass
  • D-hooks
  • Drill bit
  • Drill
  • Double stick foam tape
  • Brad nails
  • Nail gun or hammer
  • Machine screws
  • Saw (miter, jigsaw or Dremel UltraSaw)

Optional: Gorilla Glue

Instructions:

Cut backer board to the size you want for your frame.

Rustic Scrap Wood Shadow Box Frame | Pretty Handy Girl

Lay out your scrap wood on top of the backer board until it is covered completely.

Rustic Scrap Wood Shadow Box Frame | Pretty Handy Girl

I tried Gorilla Glue Construction Adhesive on this project (Gorilla Glue sent me a tube of glue to try out.) It dried and held all the scrap wood firmly.

Rustic Scrap Wood Shadow Box Frame | Pretty Handy Girl

Lift up one piece of scrap wood at a time and apply construction glue onto the backer board. Read more

Wall Art Pottery Barn Knock Off

Today we have Roxanne taking over the Rockstar DIY stage! Roxanne is the knock off queen. She will be showing us how to create these beautiful knock off Pottery Barn Blue Textile prints for much less. If Roxanne sees something from a high end store, she has the super power to create a knock off for 1/10th the price or less! She recently knocked off a $695 Restoration Hardware capiz chandelier for only $52!

You can do the math, but I know that’s a real steal.

Roxanne from The Honeycomb Home

Roxanne, is the talented DIYer behind The Honeycomb Home blog. She can frequently be found turning her cookie cutter home into a beautiful home on a budget. Please welcome the dynamic Roxanne to the stage!

Rockstar DIY Series

page_break_2

I was recently browsing my favorite website, Pottery Barn, and noticed this set of beautiful Framed Blue Textile Art. I loved the wooden frames and the blue fabrics, but not the price! They sell for $169 for one, or $334 for the pair! I realized this would be very easy to knock-off for a fraction of that price.

PB framed textile art

To re-create this look, I ordered fabric samples from Calico Corners. To make this work, you will need the larger sized samples. Average size samples are usually around 5.5″ squared. The larger versions at Calico are 27″ X 18″. I always prefer to order the larger size because its hard to get a good sense of how it will look in the room from the small size. Here is a picture of the small sample versus the large.

Fabric Sizes

I found two beautiful wood frames at Michael’s, which are normally priced $29.99, I scored them on sale for $10 each, it was a steal! I bought them in size 16″ X 20″, which is a little smaller than the Pottery Barn frames. Read more

Install a ReadyMade Mirror Frame on Door | Pretty Handy Girl

You guys, I can’t believe I have a middle schooler. I know, I know, I’ve been having a pity party for myself for two weeks. But, I’m finally coming to terms with it. This past week, I helped Handy Boy #1 de-clutter his room and carve out a space for him to do his homework (without being interrupted by his younger brother.) We moved his furniture around and actually had a lot of fun talking and working together.

Install a ReadyMade Mirror Frame on Door | Pretty Handy Girl

I also installed a mirror on his door. Although he’s not obsessed with how he looks or dresses yet, I know that time is coming soon. Instead of putting up a cheapy plastic-framed mirror, I worked with MirrorMate to test out their new READYFrame kit. You may remember when I ordered a custom MirrorMate frame for that ugly and naked mirror in my sons’ bathroom. It still looks great today (although I painted it blue for a new look.)

MirrorMate now sells pre-made frames that fit several of the standard sized mirrors you can buy at Lowe’s, IKEA or HomeDepot. I chose the Essex Crosshatch Silver and the tall 16″ x 58″ mirror from Lowe’s.

I didn’t need to purchase any hanging hardware because MirrorMate ships it with your frame.

Install a ReadyMade Mirror Frame on Door | Pretty Handy Girl

Want to see how easy it was to hang and dress up the mirror? I’ll give you a hint, it was easy and it looks beautiful!

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Install a ReadyMade Mirror Frame on Door | Pretty Handy Girl

  • MirrorMateREADYFrame
  • Screwdriver (or drill with phillips head bit)
  • Rubber mallet (or hammer)
  • Tape measure
  • Pencil
  • Level
  • Wet wipe
  • Heavy book or weight
  • Thumbtack or pin
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Cotton ball or rag
  • A helper

Assembling the Frame:

Open up the READYFrame box and remove the frame connectors from the packaging.

Install a ReadyMade Mirror Frame on Door | Pretty Handy Girl

Remove the top from the glue and peel off the seal. Poke a thumbtack in the glue bottle to create a hole in the nozzle. Apply glue to the edges of theREADYFrame. Read more

Easy Clipboard Stand | Pretty Handy Girl

Today’s project is so easy, I named it the Easy Clipboard Stand (catchy name, no?) This is a great way to upcycle an old clipboard and a scrap 2×4. This clipboard stand is super versatile. It can be used as a traditional stand for announcements; a copy stand; a recipe holder; an art frame or anything you need to bring attention to. Plus, if you use a dark chalk paint color, it can be used as a chalkboard sign. Bonus.

Materials:
(contains affiliate links)

Tools:

Instructions:

Cut the 2×4 scrap to the same width as the clipboard. Set your table saw blade approximately 2/3 height of the 2×4 block. Angle the blade to 15 degrees. Carefully slide the block over the blade. You’ll notice I use a GRR-Ripper Push Block to keep my hands away from the blade. (If you own a table saw, you need one of these!)

Easy Clipboard Stand | Pretty Handy Girl

The 2×4 should look like the photo below.  Read more