Sharing is caring!

how-to-remove-rusted-carriage-bolt

Have you ever run into a carriage bolt that is rusted and doesn’t want to come out. A first approach would be to spray WD-40 on the nut to try to lubricate it. But, if that doesn’t work, I have a simple solution! Here’s How to Remove a Rusted Carriage Bolt while keeping your sanity.

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

How to Remove a Rusted Carriage Bolt | Pretty Handy Girl

If the bolt still won’t release or the bolt just spins while you try to unscrew the nut, you’re going to need to try something else. Especially because grabbing the head of a carriage bolt is next to impossible. And trust me, I tried using pliers and vice grips to no avail.

How to Remove a Rusted Carriage Bolt | Pretty Handy Girl

The easiest solution is to cut a groove into the top of the carriage bolt. If you have a Dremel with a metal cutting wheel, you can make quick work of this task.

How to Remove a Rusted Carriage Bolt | Pretty Handy Girl

Be careful to stop cutting when you have a groove in the head of the bolt. You don’t want to cut all the way through the head.

How to Remove a Rusted Carriage Bolt | Pretty Handy Girl

Use the socket wrench on the nut and begin turning the nut while holding the bolt still with a large flat head screwdriver.

How to Remove a Rusted Carriage Bolt | Pretty Handy Girl

If the nut still won’t budge, spray more WD-40 on the nut and wait a few minutes. Than use a hammer to tap on the nut and bolt to try to break some of the rust.

How to Remove a Rusted Carriage Bolt | Pretty Handy Girl

And that’s a simple way to Remove a Rusted Carriage Bolt!

PHGFancySign

14 replies
  1. Candyce Blodgett
    Candyce Blodgett says:

    You really are brilliant!! I can hardly wait to offer this solution to a bunch of head-scratching men! And yes, I will be taking all of the credit as if I came up with it myself!! Thank you!! 🙂

    Reply
  2. Ashley
    Ashley says:

    Thank God I found this little bit of information. I was about ready to throw the whole project out because of the frustration. You are so smart! Thank you!

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] A Dremel is one of those tools that you don’t think you need until you start using it. Then you wonder how you got along without one. Cut off metal; sand in tiny areas; drill; etch into a variety of materials and even trim your pet’s nails! This little tool can do so many things if you have the right bit. (My favorite use for a Dremel is creating a notch to remove stripped screws or bolts.) […]

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *